Webinar

The Medical Side of Foster Care Webinar Series

Foster care reduces an animal’s time in the shelter – which reduces that animal’s stress and the potential for exposure to disease.  When foster animals leave the shelter, there’s more space and capacity to care for other animals in the shelter.

In 2012, Sandra Newbury, DVM, National Shelter Medicine Extension Veterinarian at the Koret Shelter Medicine Program, UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, presented three webinars on medical topics to start or help increase the capacity of your foster program. These webinar recordings are especially for shelters, rescue groups, as well as foster parents.
 

Foster Vacation Planning
Foster care reduces an animal’s length of stay in the shelter – which means animals will receive more individualized care sooner. This webinar, the first part in a 3-part series, covers fundamentals for planning, organizing, and maintaining different types of foster programs – ranging from care for pups and kittens to fospice care for geriatric or ill animals. 

 

Getting Shelter Animals Ready for Foster Care
Foster care decreases an animal’s time in the shelter, reducing stress and the potential for exposure to disease.  The second webinar in the 3-part foster care series will specifically address recommendations for preventive treatments, as well as medical / behavioral assessment, and screening before and after placement. 

 

Early-Age Care for Foster Animals
You want to move animals into foster homes as quickly as possible to free up space for other animals, but what do you do with the babies?  In the third webinar in the 3-part foster care series, Dr. Sandra Newbury will discuss early age care for puppies and kittens, from neonates to 8-weeks old.   Anyone caring for young animals will benefit for this review of foster care topics.
 

Sandra Newbury, DVM
Dr. Newbury is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine with a special interest in infectious disease and population management as it relates to group health.   Dr. Newbury joined the Koret Shelter Medicine Program at the University of California, Davis in 2006.  She also serves as the Chair of the Shelter Standards Task Force of the Association of Shelter Veterinarians and as Adjunct Assistant Professor of Shelter Medicine in the Department of Pathobiology at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine.  Dr. Newbury has published several articles and book chapters relevant to shelter medicine.  Her work has focused on infectious disease, immunology, and population medicine to improve understanding of shelter animal health, disease response and animal welfare. Dr. Newbury’s position results from a partnership between UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine and the ASPCA.

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