Blog

Subscribe

Get the ASPCA Professional Blog direct to your inbox.

Recent Comments

Hi Raquel,
Thanks, we updated the document and you should be able to read it. Make sure you right-...

By Elyse on Studying the Act of Re-Homing - 6/24/2016 at 5:45am

Two things:
1) It's easy to blame the moving-surrenderers. Occasionally it's even kinda justified (...

By Dan S. on That Is So Not What I Meant… - 6/24/2016 at 4:52am

The other problem with renting is the size of your dog or breed discrimination by landlords. They don't...

By Karyn Sallee on That Is So Not What I Meant… - 6/24/2016 at 3:24am

Filling the Pit

Dr. Emily Weiss shares evidence pointing to the fact that pit bull-type dogs are increasing in popularity.

Who is most at risk at your shelter?

One of the most common responses I receive when I ask this question is “pit bull-type dogs.” When I ask why they are at risk, the most common response I receive is that people are not coming in to adopt pit bulls.

Not sure if you read my blog post from last year that noted that pit bull-type dogs are increasing in popularity, but we now have more evidence pointing to the fact that pit bull-type dogs are very popular and wanted, with Banfield’s recent release of its “State of Pet Health™ 2014 Report.” The report is pretty rich, as it represents data on 2.3 million dogs and 470,000 cats coming to the 850 Banfield hospitals around the country. Once again, pit bull-type dogs rated as number 5 in the top ten dog breeds cared for in Banfield hospitals. This trend made me want to learn more…  

The ASPCA has a new individual animal database called CARDS (Comprehensive Animal Risk Database) that allows us to dig into data in new and really exciting ways – including an ability to break out breed and outcomes. We pulled the data from over 30 shelters from around the country that had relatively clean breed data in the system and what we found was quite telling.  

We asked what are the top breeds (including mixes with primary breed listed) available to be adopted at their agencies, and this is what we found:

Pit-type dogs are the third most frequently adopted. Wow. That is a lot of dogs.  

We then pulled the data on intake and outcomes and here is where the story gets juicy…

Guys – maybe we do not have an adoption problem – but instead we have a volume issue! One-third more pit bulls enter than the next highest intake breed type. Certainly a subset of those labeled "pit type" do not have a DNA profile indicating any bully breed, but it is also likely that some pit types are labeled as another primary breed. Why are they coming in at such a higher volume? Given the level of popularity (#5 most popular with Banfield clients), we would anticipate that they would not be the #1 intake type.  

Based on our research on the relinquishment of large dogs, I hypothesize that part of the answer has to do with the difficulty in finding housing that allows pit-type dogs. People with a pit-type dog who need to find housing likely have more difficulty than those looking for housing with their beagle mix. It is then a double whammy – as we know that many dogs are re-homed without ever entering the shelter, but if person A has trouble finding housing that will allow them to keep their pit-type dog, that same person will likely have difficulty finding someone else who can take the dog home.

This we can fix.

What are your thoughts as to the other drivers for the high volume of pit-type dogs into the sheltering system? What are your thoughts for solutions?

Related links:
“He Loves to Have His Belly Rubbed…”
“They Want ‘Em, They Really Do!” 

You Might Also Like

Saving Lives Research & Data

Comments

Comment

Very interesting.  To really see what is going on, I feel it is critical to know that these 30 shelters do not have policies that discourage or prohibit pitbull adoptions.  Do they have about the same % of dogs labeled as pibull dogs as shelters that do not have breed labels that are as clean?  Does the "clean data" have anything to do with the importance of a shelter puts on identifying dogs as pitbulls?  Also, it is important to know the average live release rate (total and dogs only) of these shelters...and are these  shelters doing proactive adoption marketing, or no adoption marketing?  Thank you.

Comment

I find this very true!! I was at the forefront of this when Waterford Michigan decided to ban pitbulls, My Peabo was raised with love and never once showed any aggression toward people or other animals. I was fortunate that he was grandfathered when they passed the law and he actually lived to be 19 years old. Bad owners make the reputation not bad dogs.

 

Comment

LOVE this article. In FL, it is Insurance Companies who are using BSL to raise rates. Fiona'-8 yr old pit mix, is my Service Dog. I'm told too many times "pit bulls cannot be Service Dogs"...ignorance is no excuse. Now training Gizmo, Service Dog In Training. Peabo's age is AWESOME! Looking forward to MANY enriched years training Pit Bulls! :)

 

Comment

My brother has a pit bull who is a certified therapy dog.  She actually did better than their Australian Shepard.  Pits have such a caring sweet personality.  Just like people it's all in hpw you are raised.  I thank you from the bottom of my heart for taking time to show the world this breed is amazing and can succed.  

Comment

I can relate to you. My pit is a mix between a pit bull and a Rhodesian Ridgeback and he is so loving and behaves better than most dogs. he has never hurt a thing except one time he ate a butterfly :)

Comment

I feel that a lot of the problem is that homeowners insurance will not allow them, apartments, even ones who allow big dogs will not allow them and renters can not find homes that will rent to them. Add

to that military bases will not allow them, tney are good enough to risk their lives but not good enough to live on base. Add  the communities who ban them. This is why pits have a hard time getting adopted. Until the above discrimination is ended pits will continue to die. It is not thst people do not want to adopt pits it is that they are not allowed in many places

 

Comment

I also think housing insurance makes it hard on people with pit bull/type dogs. I think if they would at least consider the tenant to get apt ins. Or a extra deposit to cover the extra ins. Then there's the landlord's who have oaid off the property but, due to media ect they become prejudice because it is a bully breed which frankly with the amount people charge for rent these days, they should criticize or be prejudice of any breed! Kids often do more damage and are more of a health risk with injury's than most dog's.

Comment

VERY TRUE!!!!!!!!

Comment

I agree w/you 1000%.. I have owned 3 in my life. 1 out of the 3 had aggressive tendencies..That was not due to the up bringing...With saying that I do agree that it is how you bring them up..However, we as humans have no idea whether our Put bull breed will be any aggressive behavior. We all can hope for the best, work w/ them to the best of our ability to ensure a great dog. I will never stop owning the breed. It is my favorite of all breeds.

Comment

I totally agreed!!!   There are some breeds that have behavior problems when we adopt them, but  a professional help them.  So, pitbulls need training, and a lot of love.

It's important to teach the kids, and some adults, how to approch the dogs.

Comment

Agreed. A large number of shelters have breed specific adoption policies that make it harder to adopt pit bulls. Then play the "there aren't enough good owners" card.

Comment

Overpopulation of pits...just look at shelters, look at the ads run on For Sale and Giveaway Pets....it's mostly pits. As long as it's like this the reputation will not change. Wish pit advocates spent more time going after pit owners on being responsible as they do trying to change public opinion.

Comment

Pit advocates spend enormous amounts of time trying to educate owners, not only about containment and training, but about getting animals fixed. Most cities have free pit fixing programs since that makes a huge difference in behavior as well as reducing the stray population. I know a group in my city that works to provide kennels in order to get dogs off of chains while also working with owners to educate on safety and care. 

 

Advocates can work on the issue from more than one point of view, as both the public and owners need to be educated adn work together. 

Comment

It is so nice to hear about the city providing kennels. I love that idea. I think there are several reasons the population is so high. 1 is many are mislabeled as Pits. 2 there is nothing cuter than a Pit puppy, but guess what people, they get older and very powerful without training they can be hard to handle for many members of the family. So what do they do? Turn them in. We need to do everything we can to help the owners. From breed identification to free spay and neuter to training. What ever is needed so we can keep these dog out of the shelters in the first place. This breed doesn't do well they get kennel stress quickly and that doesn't usually turn out of well. God bless the Pittys.

Comment

I completely agree.

Comment

Exactly!

Comment

In our area, there's been a flood of bully breeds at the shelters and rescues, mostly courtesy of backyard breeders. dope dealers and dog fighting rings.  There's also a large cultural component that sees owning bully breed dogs as a status symbol and a moneymaker. 

That same component also seems to consist primarily of people who rent, rather than own, their residences.  So they're subject to breed- or size-specific bans by landlords that prohibit bully breed dogs supposedly out of fear of lawsuits stemming from dog bites and attacks.  Insurance companies who provide renters' or homeowners' insurance use the bans, too, reportedly for the same reasons.

In our community, there are also drug dealers who keep bully breed dogs as "protection" for their criminal activities.  It's my observation that these dog owners are the least responsible in socializing, training and caring for their dogs because, simply put, they WANT them to be aggressive. 

As for bully breed advocates needing to "go after" irresponsible pit owners, it's necessary to point out that LAW ENFORCEMENT and LOCAL GOVERNMENT are supposed to hold animal owners accountable.  Advocates have no legal authority to make anyone do anything.  We can only educate and encourage.

If your community doesn't have effective, sensible and humane laws from which law enforcement, prosecutors and the courts can take action against irresponsible owners, then YOU can take action to do something about it! 

 

Comment

Great blog.  I love looking at a what many of us consider a very real challenge for animal welfare around the county from a slightly different angle and using data collection to bring parts of the situation into sharper focus.  It is going to take more information like this and adjustments to our assumptions and tactics to bring about significant positive change for pit bull type dogs and other animals we consider to be at higher risk.

Dave

Comment

There is a substantial issue with backyard breeding. Pit "types" produce large litters & they are often bred & sold for quick cash in under served communities. Often time these dogs become a nuisance when their "owners" are uneducated in the basic training. The puppy becomes destructive, un socialized, not excersised & the dog is then either dumped or tethered outside( almost always unaltered). Community outreach & no cost spay/neuter is critical to reducing the overbreeding & common inbreeding that is occurring.

Comment

I so agree. If we had more low cost or even free spay/nuter programs available we would have this over population. Most people I know love there dogs including pit bulls and wish they could get them fixed but can not afford it.th dog gets loose and u have another litter. So they sell them cheep or even give them away and the cycle starts again and more are picked up and in the shelters. I live in union county sc and we have 1 small high kill shelter and no pit bull is put up for adoption. A rescue has to come in or he/she is pts. And we have no low cost spay clinic available. So sad.

Comment

I agree -- backyard breeding is a major issue. In my community, I see "pit puppies for sale" signs far more than any other type of dog (chi's 2nd) ... and it seems too often they are people looking to sell a few for money or neighborhood prestige. They don't come anywhere close to "reputable breeder", I highly doubt giving any thought to genetics ... and sadly sometimes giving thought to temperaments but in the wrong direction. Access to low-cost spay/neuter doesn't address their motivations, nor does preaching about the greater good and shelter killing. Licensing/laws trying to cover puppy mills doesn't touch the many people having just one or two litters each year. So we have this big source pool coming at us that ... I don't know how we influence change! We need to have intelligent conversations about sticky issues though ... glad to see this posted in ASPCAPro and looking forward to reading comments.

Comment

This is also what I've seen in the neighborhoods I've lived in.  I've spoken to the backyard breeders (often young guys but sometimes families too) who do care about their dogs but also do it for money and prestige.  Some of them are so proud to have an awesome dog others are envious of and be able to make money selling puppies even after seeing the pages and pages of pits available for adoption at the city shelter via my phone.  Some of these guys are neighbors I'd been friendly with for years.  Most of these guys seem to not think about the fact that it's possible if they're selling pups, somewhere down the line either their pup or their pups' offspring could end up in places they wouldn't want.  Nor consider that others would breed their puppies!  Nor consider that people might not be able to keep these dogs as adults or pass them on to other people.  I agree in some areas these sources are possibly a good part of the quantity of dogs who end up in a shelter environment because there is no disincentive to breeding.  (In addition to housing issues or behavior issues being reasons that dogs are abandoned or surrendered.)  There's no way you could give them ALL of the things they get from breeding -- the money, prestige and pride and the sense of sharing a great dog with others.

I absolutely agree that housing is an issue as well.

Comment

I'm the veterinarian for a municipal shelter in southern San Diego. The local population of humans is largely Hispanic and largely underserved. Running at large pit bulls and mixes are a huge part of our shelter intakes, as are Chihuahuas.  We offer free spay/neuter clinics for all breeds of dogs (and cats) to low income owners once weekly. Periodically, we and other shelters and spay/neuter advocates in the community offer free Pit Bull only clinics. At these clinics, we have the lowest turnout and the hardest time getting dogs in to s/n. In my humble opinion, it's not a lack of services offered that is responsible for PB overpopulation. It is the owner's attitudes that allow intact dogs to run at large, the owners that sell pit bull puppies for cash, and the amazing fecundity of the pit bull breed (s).  Until our local humans change their attitudes about having their animals spayed/neutered and about keeping them responsibly confined, we will continue to have overpopulation.

Comment

God bless you for the work you're doing in your community!

My take on your last comment, though, is that getting people in underserved populations to "change their attitudes" doesn't seem to happen until law enforcement, prosecutors, the courts, residents' groups AND local nonprofits work together to find solutions.  Attitudes seem to change when people are held accountable and pay a price.  

Comment

# 1 - We need high volume spay/neuter campaigns targeted to areas with high intake rates of pit-bull type dogs.

# 2 - Humane education and resources for those who need them in order to keep their pets safe and healthy as well as provide affordable services that will reduce the likelihood of surrendering their animals and/or reuniting lost pets through free/low cost micro-chip services.

# 3 - Also, providing pet food and supply bank services, training/obedience classes etc. - all things that will keep animals in their homes and less likely in shelters.

There needs to be a multi-tiered approach - tougher legislation for backyard breeders for one; free/low cost spay programs; education programs for both owners and their pets; and more resources to keep pet owners from surrendering their pets.

Only comprehensive approaches with the end goal in mind will work – reducing the overpopulation problem in the first place.

As a public health professional – I look at this problem very much the same as the pet overpopulation problem – PREVENTION FIRST. Health care is slowly moving in the right direction and focusing on preventing problems so that we don’t have to treat them after the fact. Increasing adoptions is great, but that’s the “treating” stage – we need to work on reducing shelter intake in the first place to truly have an impact on euthanasia in America and beyond.

I have realized that my work in public health translates seamlessly in the animal welfare profession and I am working on transitioning careers  as animal welfare is my true passion!

Keep up the good work ASPCA.

`Kristi

Comment

Kristi -  Thank you for your thoughts and insight!  We agree there are some great ties to human health services to our work - both direct and indirect.  

Comment

All very true! But some people are VERY stuborn about NEUTERING their male dogs, no matter how educated they may be on the subject. If their dog gets a stray or tethered female pregnant (tethered belonging to someone without the funds or knowlage of spay/neuter) then why should they care? Many people don't want their male dog altered because of the myths that altering the dog changes it's personality or takes away the dogs 'tough looks'. Now, people who have a female dog, pit bull or other, know that they HAVE to alter her unless they want puppies. But spaying is more risky and costs more than neutering so it might be put off too long. In short, its the careless owners of unaltered males that need to be convinced to neuter, and its the veterinarian clinics and volunteers that need to do everything they can to provide free or low cost spayand neutering to the people who want their dog altered, but simply cant afford it.       

Comment

I agree. I had my dogs spayed as soon as they were old enough. I know several men that do not want to neuter their male dogs (they cringe like its thier testicles) so I start listing the health reasons for having it done..and I am very tenacious about it.

Comment

Yes, some of us have chosen not to neuter our Pittbull males. Not because I am stubborn or uneducated. I am all for spay and neutering. In our case, which is rare, I am considering my dog's well being. I had planned on neutering him when I got him at the age of 7. That year he was put under anesthesia for X-rays as the vet suspected arthritis. It was horrible when my dog came to. He had a extreme reaction to the anesthesia. Try carrying an 87lb deadweight dog out of a car and up a flight of stairs by yourself! I'm 127lbs. Then stay up all night on the phone with the vet worried that your dog is going to die. An experience I will never put him through again unless absolutely necessary. The well renowned vet agreed.

My dog is NEVER left unattended. We don't have strays in my area of the city. Strays are picked up by animal control quickly. Our yard is fully fenced. If we go to events, I make sure that there are no unspayed females. If there are, we don't attend. 

Comment

Cali, you bring up a very good point! Some dogs react very badly to anesthesia (a friend has Mastiffs and, as she explained it to me, that breed has high risk with anesthesia, just as an example). I recall reading an article some months ago about chemical castration, e.g., Neutersol. Your boy is older than the recommended age of use, 3-10 months of age, but it's something for others to look into if they're looking for Pittie puppy.

This is just one link I found about this: http://veterinarymedicine.dvm360.com/vetmed/Medicine/Nonsurgical-methods...

So far, all the information I've tracked down has no viable alternative to a hysterectomy for females, though. Neutersol is for males only. It's a step forward, at least, albeit a small one.

Comment

This is a great way of thinking for a Socialist or Totalitarian State.  However, in the land of the free the owner should be free to choose.  I am so tired of Millions of dollars being wasted on trying to convince people to spay or neuter when the money should be spent lobbying for greater penalites for irresponsible pet owners.  The ones that have their dogs constantly getting out of the yard.  The ones that take their aggressive Pit Bull to the park and wonder why it attacks some poor labrador retriever (this happened to mine).  Why not go after those who are breeding them irresponsibly.  If you want to spay and neuter...great.  Your choice.  But don't force your beliefs down my throat when I am a responsible pet owner and keep my labs in their  yard, on their leash, and treat them like family.  Why not figure out a way to change those in those impoverished areas that allow their dogs to run the streets, Tie them up with chains to make them more aggressive, and sell pits knowing their neighbors are going to fight them.  Those should be your targets, not the average citizen that does not affect the lives of others...Oh wait, this isn't the same America we grew up in.....

Comment

Agreed. I wish for ONCE we could have a real discussion without it devoloving into a "spay/neuter your pets" tirade. 

Comment

In addition to collecting data on the animals turned into shelters (breed, age, reason for relinquishment) I believe that a lot could be learned about the reasons that animals are being turned into shelters if demographic data were also collected when an animal is turned in. Things like the zip code where the person lives, their age, their occupation (employed, unemployed, student etc.) would contribute greatly to developing hypotheses about what is going on. Until we can understand the intake end of the equation it will be difficult to target programs and find solutions to the large numbers of animals still flooding our nation's shelters. Differences between urban, suburban and rural communities could also be teased out when cross-correlated with census data. I believe that the animal welfare crisis in America is a sociological problem that can be solved with a better understanding of pet owner demographics. From my reading of your wonderful blogs I know you know this!

Comment

This type of dog is popular. So popular everyone and their mother thinks they can make some money by breeding their dogs and selling the pups---over and over and over again. And most pit bulls have large litters---ten, twelve, fifteen pups at a time!

You know about the spay/neuter pyramid?  I think that may show people who aren't breeding their dogs what kind of impact their unaltered animal has on the community.  

Let's say, for example, that you have five different people in your neighborhood who are indending or intentionally breeding and selling their pups (because the breed is so popular)?  Well, there's FIVE separate spay/neuter pyramids going on around you!!

So we've got: more "supply" than "demand" and different restrictional aspects surrounding this type of dog (bully breed friendly housing, BSL, etc.).

As far as our area (Louisville, KY)? We absolutely have a volume issue.  

 

 

Comment

For several years I have been saying that there are too many pitbulls.

I believe that in my area they are bred in part to make money(not a reality), in part due to the economic culture of the prevailing owners. Many cannot afford to spay/neuter or won't spay/neuter for whatever reason.

The other issue is that so many mix breed dogs have the characteristics of the pitbull. I know that many are not pitbulls but they look pittie.

I try to limit the number of pitbull type dogs I have in my shelter so that I have a variety of "types and breeds". It would be easy to have a shelter full of pitbulls but the truth is that they don't move as fast in my area. I also avoid a shelter full of hounds or retreivers. If I have too much of one type. adoptions stagnate. Variety is the spice of life!

Don't get me wrong I love pitties.

We are in the middle of a free spay/neuter event for pitbulls and their mixes so i'm hoping it will help with our population numbers.

For now we do our best to showcase our pits so that they are adopted into appropriate homes,  as soon as possible to make room for another!

Comment

Sue, very level headed comments, thanks. I'm just getting started with a volunteer position at my local animal shelter and at orientation I definitely observed that a majority of dogs at the shelter were of the Pit or Pit mix variety. I'm wondering if there is any sort of DNA testing being implemented at animal shelters/veterinary hospitals to more accurately verify an animals roots, to better identify the breed origin? Statistics are a good tool but scientific accuracy seems an important component in breed identification as applied to the stats. Thanks for your service to the animals!

Comment

I volunteer in a no-kill rescue and we also have many dogs that appear to have some type of pit bull in them. I can tell you that paying the vet bills every month is a challenge, I have no idea where we would come up with the funds for a DNA test.  If we have extra money, we pay our kennel cleaners more, or have a dog trainer come, or pay for vetting of dogs of fosters.  People have it in their heads what they want when they come to look at dogs, and every once in a while, their minds are totally changed when they meet their soul dog.  Most of the comments here have been positive, for which I am glad.  Those who speak out against spay/neuter because of some issue with 'Murrica and its freedoms are fools.  If there is an actual medical issue that precludes spay/neuter, that is fine.  

Comment

Pitbulls breeds are a quick way of backyard breeders making cash. They can make 1000-5000 on a litter of puppies. Till we find a way to stop this problem. We will never stop the rate of pitbulls being euthanized. Their breed will become a larger part of the population and therefore a higher risk to be PTS. 

There are bigger problems than housing. Pitbulls are fast cash for poor people. We have bigger issues than dealing with landlords that won't allow this type of dog - WE have people who use them as cash cows. Not dog fighters - everyday families who have litter after litter to pay their rent. 

And no I don't have the answer but we aren't going to fix the problem till we look at the whole picture. 

Comment

Would it be unrealistic to legally make any breeder have to register & apply somehow for litters? Maybe that would be too difficult to police but sure sounds like a good place to start!

Comment

I believe part of the reason "pit bull" adoptions are growing is because there are more of them being abandoned because people can't keep them. I also believe that many of these dogs are labeled as "pit bulls" because of their appearances but they may not actually be a pit bull. A study was done a few years back that DNA tested dogs labeled as pit bulls at a shelter in New York. More than half of those dogs were not even pit bulls, but other mixes of breeds like bull dogs, dobermins, shepherds, Labradors, Rhodesian ridgebacks, mastiffs, and many other breeds. 

I am happy though that the publics view of pit bulls and Pit bull type looking dogs are changing in a more positive way and I hope that More and more people will adopt them! My hope is that people will spay and neuter their pets too!!!!

Comment

These conclusions seem a little squishy.  Your numbers show that Pit Bulls are both numerically and proportionately less likely to be adopted.  If it was merely a supply issue where their rate of adoption was identical to Labs or Chihuahuas but lots more Pits were being surrendered, then a goal of only reducing intake to be more in line with other more popular breeds would be sufficient.  Clearly, while no one can say Pits are not a popular breed, they aren't the most popular in terms of adoption demand while they still flood shelter intake.  The idea that housing issues primarily or even significantly account for either case seems a stretch (or at least needs support) or at the very least wouldn't account for the massive disparity.  It would be interesting to see relinquishment, adoption, and euthanasia numbers against the demographics of breed owners, relinquishers, and adopters.  Will it be housing and breed which drive this disparity or income and/or access to preventative services such as veterinary care among the population with the highest rates of pit bull ownership?

Comment

I think the 2 main reasons why there are so

many pitbulls in shelters is: 1. Definitely the issue with finding apartments even homes that allow pitbulls. I live in Florida and none of the HOA communities allow pitbulls, so even if you own your home you can't have. Pitbull. 2. Because pitbulls are so popular they are frequently bred for money. Unfortunately, not enough people neuter/spay their dogs and pitbulls are bred numerous times in order to make a few $$$. 

Comment

I concur! I would love to adopt a pit. There have been several lovely pups languishing at our county facility. When we were interested in adopting our last dog, I would have taken a sweet little blue girl in an instant. Why didn't I? Because the city I live in BANS them!! The state lifted its "vicious" label from the breed, but cities are still allowed to indescriminately ban them. I have had chihuahua's more vicious than the pits I have encountered!

Comment

As a Multibreed Dog Rescue, the lion's share of our volume comes from New York Animal Care and Control, where bully breeds abound.  No breed of dog so points up the pendulum of human stupidity than the Pit Bull.  The data above crystallizes what anyone with a sharp eye can see when walking the wards of any shelter:  the pit population is out of control.  On intake, it is nearly impossible to find a female pit over 1 year old, who has not given birth to multiple litters, and while pit puppies seem to be in demand, pits over 2 are sadly, over the hill.  Our societal reaction to the Pit problem has been completely off base. We have legislated restrictions on owning Pits (Boston, MA requires a muzzle on all Pits walked in public, and Pawtucket, RI has outlawed them completely), as well as restrictions on housing and home owners insurance, while the breeders, reputable or not, continue to bring these dogs into the world, only to be euthanized en masse at taxpayers expense. So despite the rampant popularity of the bully breeds, we have legislatively squashed demand, while allowing breeders freedom to amp up supply.  The only way to dig out from this disaster of breed genocide is to start holding backyard and hobby breeders, as well as owners who fail to spay and neuter, accountable, with consequences, for their contributions to the problem.  If it can be illegal to own a Pit, then it should be illegal to breed one.....at least until Rescue can catch up. 

Comment

As the very proud owner of a Pit Bull, I agree with the article but I also know that a Pit is a very strong willed & mind breed & if not handled & trained properly can be a handful.  Another reason why I think people that start with adopting a Pit Bull end up taking them to a shelter. 

 

Comment

The reason their is such a volume issue is because their are SO MANY breeders! I live in a small town and there are at least 6 breeders within a 30 mile radius. I have heard people say they have to get a pitbull as a puppy because if you get one as an adult it is untrainable and can turn on you. Not to mention you have these people that bring a pitbull in a pet store with a double spiked wide collar, that is not properly trained, and let it lunge at people and other dogs. I love this breed, I have 3 pitties myself (all rescues) but I would never bring my dog in if it acted like that. It is incouraging the bad rap and it makes people even more scared of the breed. Also, so many places for rent DO NOT allow pitbull type dogs. I have even seen instances where insurance makes you pay a higher fee for having a pitbull. These things cause people to give up their pits which usually end up in the shelter.

Comment

I rescued a pit. He's changed my life. I try to advocate for the breed. My pit is not mean however..I socialize him and spend alot of time with him. Ppl don't devote the time to an animal. They are like kids.

Comment

Cost may be a deterrent for some to adopt a pit bull type dog as well. There are only so many insurance companies will cover pit bulls. I had to drop my rather inexpensive homeowners and now have a much higher rate because I adopted a pit bull.  Even if they have no bite history, and no signs of aggression or behavioral issues, some companies will not cover them.  

Comment

I recently had to find an apartment that would allow my AmStaff "pit bull" to live there. Giving her up was not an option, so it took several weeks, willingness to double my commute time, a hefty non-refundable pet deposit, and a letter from the therapy animal group we belong to in order to find a place to live. I was lucky to have some time to apartment hunt and a friend that was willing to let my dog hang at their place while I got settled in with my two other furbabies.
I was upfront with complexes about my dog being an AmStaff because pit bull isn't really a breed, and most had no problem with AmStaff because their insurance didn't ban them...most places gave resistance to her size. I found that the most common weight limit is 25-30lbs max, and only one pet allowed.
I think bringing attention to the fact that pibbles make great neighbors is so important because most people just don't know. Property management and landlords should be encouraged to do pet interviews instead of holding blanket polices because let's face it a Chihuahua or Pomeranian are more likely to eat an entire room of carpet or bite their neighbors ankles.

Comment

the  first comment is spot  on. The California Shelters discourage adopting Pits, the one that i went to finally had a rate of 1800 in 1750 down. Not good odds, furthermore, i wanted to take 2, they refused just because the handler took a dislike to one. I know this because a animal Behavior Specialist came to the house to work with us, due to my oldest being disabled, she works with shelter to determine their aggression/adoption safety level and said he was cleared.  

30 shelters cross section doesnot even come close,,,,,, Poor Clayton County in Ga. is crying out for help with their program, a shame more shelters do not sound the alarms themselves. Hope you all can lend a hand in helping them organize help.

Pages

Add a comment